Health Benefits: Over 90 percent of coconut oil is saturated fat, which historically has been associated with higher blood cholesterol levels. But the oil also contains medium chain triglycerides, which are more easily and rapidly used by the body’s cells as energy, and may be less likely to be stored as fat, Wright says. It’s tricky with coconut oil: The MCT oil may raise healthy HDL cholesterol as well as unhealthful LDL cholesterol. Research suggests these MCTs may increase your body’s ability to burn fat as fuel, but studies showing a significant trigger for lose weight is lacking. 
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Hi, Congrats on finishing chemo & radiation that’s awesome!! I wish you the best of luck!! I was actually wanting to know about dosage for cancer as well..My parents both have recently been diagnosed with cancer 4 months apart and are currently going thru chemo together. I have tried looking for the dosage info but can never find what i’m looking for..I want to try to help lesson the chemo side effects and hopefully kill some of the cancer cells. Can someone please help us?Thank You Christy
I don't know about you, but I grew up thinking canola oil was one step away from propane—AKA, really friggin bad for you. Shaw begs to differ. She says people often think of it as unhealthy because they associate it with fried food. And though yes, canola oil's high smoke point (400 degrees F) and neutral flavor makes it an excellent vehicle for frying, it isn't actually all that bad for you on its own. Much like most of the other healthy oils on this list, it's low in saturated fats, and can be used for roasting, frying, and baking. Because it has a neutral taste that doesn't do much for your food in the flavor department, cooks don't usually recommend using it for sautéing. The reason it has a high smoke point is because it is chemically processed, but that doesn’t have much of an effect on its health qualities.
In 2019, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) announced that CBD and other cannabinoids would be classified as "novel foods",[85] meaning that CBD products would require authorization under the EU Novel Food Regulation stating: because "this product was not used as a food or food ingredient before 15 May 1997, before it may be placed on the market in the EU as a food or food ingredient, a safety assessment under the Novel Food Regulation is required."[86] The recommendation – applying to CBD extracts, synthesized CBD, and all CBD products, including CBD oil – was scheduled for a final ruling by the European Commission in March 2019.[85] If approved, manufacturers of CBD products would be required to conduct safety tests and prove safe consumption, indicating that CBD products would not be eligible for legal commerce until at least 2021.[85]
Soy is something that is best avoided or at least reduced in consumption unless it is fermented (like tempeh, natto or fermented soy sauce). Soy is high in phytic acid and trypsin inhibitors which means that it blocks the absorption of many vitamins, minerals and proteins. It also contains phytoestrogens that can mimic estrogen in the body and disrupt normal hormone function which could possibly lead to increased cancer risk.
CBD products that don't contain THC fall outside the scope of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency's (DEA) Controlled Substances Act, which means CBD products are legal to sell and consume as long as they don't have THC. That's likely one of the reasons why CBD products, including CBD oil, are becoming more socially acceptable and increasingly popular. In 2016, Forbes reported that CBD products are expected to be a $2.2 billion industry by 2020.
Cannabidiol can be taken into the body in multiple ways, including by inhalation of cannabis smoke or vapor, as an aerosol spray into the cheek, and by mouth. It may be supplied as CBD oil containing only CBD as the active ingredient (no added tetrahydrocannabinol [THC] or terpenes), a full-plant CBD-dominant hemp extract oil, capsules, dried cannabis, or as a prescription liquid solution.[2] CBD does not have the same psychoactivity as THC,[9][10][11] and may affect the actions of THC.[7][8][9][12] Although in vitro studies indicate CBD may interact with different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors,[9][13]as of 2018 the mechanism of action for its biological effects has not been determined.[8][9]
Whereas Michigan already had medical weed legalized to make for a quicker route to starting full legislation, these states don't yet have an operational system in place. North Dakota and West Virginia also still are not operational yet, nor in Louisiana or Arkansas. Ohio is also behind schedule, having been unable to meet their goal of having operational dispensaries two years after voting for legalization. And until those are operational, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy ruled that any CBD products not sold in dispensaries licensed by the state's program are illegal.
In 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine convened a panel of experts to review the health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids. They examined more than 10,000 studies, most of which examined marijuana, not CBD. They found evidence that some cannabinoids — not including CBD — are effective for pain, nausea from chemotherapy and muscle spasms in multiple sclerosis.
I know choosing the right product is a bit tricky as you have hemp oil or CBD oil (containing real CBD) and you have Hempseed oil which might still be very rich in goodness but contain about zero CBD. It means it has a very different effect. I learned the hard way when I received the bottle. It says you have more than 200 mg hempseed oil per serving... while product with CBD would tell you the actual dose per serving which is around 16-20mg... so I am not arguing about the quality of the product just saying I was buying CBD to calm joint pains and I end up with a product rich in Omega’s but with zero CBD. Needless to say that I have tried but got zero result. Missleading in my opinion
Confused about which oils are heart-healthy and which aren’t? We asked for advice from James D. Perko, CEC, AAC, Executive Chef, for Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute and Center for Lifestyle Medicine, and dietitians Katherine Patton, MEd, RD, CSSD, LD, and Julia Zumpano, RD, from the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute’s Preventive Cardiology Program. Advertising … Read More
Infusions: Research and opportunity have driven chefs and chemists to infuse CBD into all sorts of readily usable products, such as edibles to elixirs, sublingual sprays, capsules and even topicals. Much like concentrates, each infusion sports specific combinations or isolations of CBD, THC, and other cannabinoids, allowing users to pick and choose products that suit their exact needs. CBD topicals, for example, are incredibly effective when applied to surface-level problems like bruises, joint aches, and headaches, and have been scientifically proven to successfully combat skin-based issues including pruritus with far broader implications.
Health Benefits: Your chicken thighs and breasts will be damn lucky to get a rubdown with grapseed oil. Sure, it’s not as widely used as some other plant-based options, but grapeseed oil has something olive oil does not: high linoleic acid levels. And, according to new research out of Ohio State University, that high lipid content can lower your risk for heart disease and diabetes. What’s more, previous research suggests taking linoleic acid supplements, or as little as a teaspoon and a half of oil, was all it took to increase lean body mass and reduce fat in the midsection, the researchers say. Grapeseed oil is an excellent source of linoleic acid; it constitutes about 80 percent of its fatty acids.
About 49% of the weight of hempseed is an edible oil[7] that contains 76% as essential fatty acids; i.e., omega-6 fatty acids including linoleic acid (LA, 54%) and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 3%), omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 17%) in addition to monounsaturated fat (5% to 11%) and stearidonic acid (2%).[8] Hemp seed oil contains 5% to 7% saturated fat.[7][8] In common with other oils, hempseed oil provides 9 kcal/g. Compared with other culinary oils it is low in saturated fatty acids.[8]
There's also the question of CBD's legality – something that's a lot grayer than the black-and-white picture most companies paint. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration considers CBD, like all cannabinoids, a schedule 1 drug. That means it's just as illegal as heroin and ecstasy. Meanwhile, hemp – a variety of the cannabis plant regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture – is legal , so long as its THC content is negligibly low. But because the agriculture department doesn't test for CBD – only THC – in hemp, more companies are getting away with selling products they say contain CBD, says Sara Jane Ward, an assistant professor of pharmacology at the Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine who's been studying CBD in rodent models for more than 10 years. Needless to say, the legality of CBD is "very confusing and very gray," she says.
Confused about which oils are heart-healthy and which aren’t? We asked for advice from James D. Perko, CEC, AAC, Executive Chef, for Cleveland Clinic’s Wellness Institute and Center for Lifestyle Medicine, and dietitians Katherine Patton, MEd, RD, CSSD, LD, and Julia Zumpano, RD, from the Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute’s Preventive Cardiology Program. Advertising … Read More
Creams and salves for musculoskeletal discomfort generally contain very small amounts of CBD that are absorbed through the skin. Many of these products do provide significant benefit, however, but the benefit is likely derived from other aspects of CBD — especially terpenes from cannabis and essential oils, thanks to their anti-inflammatory properties.
The benefits of CBD and other non-THC cannabinoids don’t stop there. Terpenes and the wide spectrum of other chemical compounds found in hemp flower-bud extracts provide potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. And like most other herbs, hemp flower-bud extracts have been associated with antimicrobial properties, though cannabis doesn’t appear to be as strong an antimicrobial as many other herbs.
This oil has a couple interesting characteristics: For one, it's high in omega-3 fatty acids, and Sasson says you may want look into using it more often if you don't eat a lot of fish. But she says you absolutely can't cook with it, because it's incredibly sensitive to heat and oxidizes quickly. For this reason, she says you'll want to buy small bottles so you can use it up quickly, and be extra sure to store it in a cool dark place. She suggests drizzling it over dips like hummus, or using it in salad dressings.
In theory, getting a false positive on a drug test from CBD oil should be relatively impossible from pure CBD oil containing less than .3 percent THC. However, because CBD oil is not very well regulated, there is no guarantee that a product contains pure CBD oil, or that its concentration is at a safe or effective level. It is best to use utmost caution and do your research when purchasing a quality CBD oil product to ensure its purity, especially if you need to undergo drug screenings.
Tammy et al, Through trial and error you will find a correct dosage. Try 50 mg daily....25 each 2x daily....if no results up the dosage until it works for you. Remember, there has never been a death from marijuana or CBD use. You might want to try a tincture or rub with CBD and THC. You won't get the psych high from it. Helps my friend with PArkinsons tremors. She takes 50mg of tincture and uses the rub morning and night. It is a miracle for arthritis. Good luck

We thumbed through the latest research, the USDA’s database on food nutrition and safety, and consulted with registered dietitian Hillary Wright to identify the health benefits of eight different oils and when it’s best to use them (depending on their smoke points) to make your time in the kitchen less daunting and more nutritious. Just remember, moderation is key. “It’s best to follow the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and limit oils and saturated fats to less than 10 percent of your overall calories per day,” Wright says.


Health Benefits: Touted as being one of the planet’s most sustainably made food sources, algae oil is said to help preserve heart health, lower body inflammation, and serve as the perfect pantry essential. “Algae oil also contains DHA, and important omega 3 fatty acid also found in fish oil that’s good for your cardiovascular system,” Wright says. 
To be fair, the paucity of data about CBD’s efficacy and safety in part reflects the federal government’s irrational restrictions on cannabis research. Because cannabis is classified as a Schedule 1 drug, you need a license from the Drug Enforcement Administration to research it and, until two years ago, you could use only the cannabis grown at the University of Mississippi.
All of this cooking oil isn’t exactly doing us any good, either: Physician and biochemist Cate Shanahan, author of Deep Nutrition: Why Your Genes Need Traditional Food, estimates that, at this point in time, roughly 45 percent of the average American’s calories come from refined oils. She’s also told me time and time again that consuming too much vegetable oil (an umbrella term for plant-based oils) can result in fatty liver disease, insulin resistance and migraines.
Depending on who you ask, coconut oil should either be avoided or embraced in moderation. The main point of conflict is its high saturated fat content; unlike other plant-based oils, coconut oil is primarily a saturated fat. Not everyone agrees that such a concentrated source of saturated fat is a no-go for health, but some experts, including the American Heart Association, argue that replacing foods that are high in saturated fat with healthier options can lower blood cholesterol levels and improve lipid profiles. Still, science is starting to suggest that not all saturated fats are bad for you.
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