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Cooper recently got funding from the National Institutes of Health for a study looking at cannabinoids — including CBD in isolation — as a substitute for opioids, and numerous other clinical trials of CBD are underway. It will be several years before results are available, but these studies should help clarify both what benefits the substance may provide and any side effects it may come with. Most of the adverse effects so far associated with cannabis, such as impairments in short-term memory, coordination and judgment,2 come from products that contain THC as well as CBD, Cooper said, but we need to do more studies to find out for sure whether CBD has fewer risks. Studies are also needed to identify the best way to administer and dose CBD. “I get emails from people asking me what dose of CBD to use, and the truth is, we really don’t know,” Cooper said.
While most supplements have a single recommended dose, CBD is different. The amount of CBD you take depends on your doctor’s recommendations and your own research into how CBD will work for your unique needs. In general, it’s smart to start with a medium dose of CBD. This way, you can increase or decrease the dose as needed. In addition, it’s recommended to start with one half ML (half a dropper) of CBD oil, because you can always take more if needed.
As the PeaceHealth website suggests, hemp oil derives from a plant that contains high levels of the neurological chemical THC. This chemical can cause hallucinations, euphoria or high anxiety in supplement users when taken on a regular basis. As such, hemp oil supplements can cause similar effects in some patients using the herb for the treatment of any disorder. It is recommended that supplement users not take hemp oil products prior to operating machinery or driving due to the risk of these hallucinogenic properties. This is especially true to individuals who are overly-sensitive to THC, which can be determined by visiting your medical doctor for more information.
Last year, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine released a nearly 500-page report on the health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids. A committee of 16 experts from a variety of scientific and medical fields analyzed the available evidence — more than 10,000 scientific abstracts in all. Because so few studies examine the effects of CBD on its own, the panel did not issue any findings about CBD specifically, but it did reach some conclusions about cannabis and cannabinoids more generally. The researchers determined that there is “conclusive or substantial evidence” supporting the use of cannabis or cannabinoids for chronic pain in adults, multiple sclerosis-related spasticity (a kind of stiffness and muscle spasms), and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The committee also found “moderate” evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids can reduce sleep disturbances in people with obstructive sleep apnea, fibromyalgia, chronic pain and multiple sclerosis, as well as “limited” evidence that these substances can improve symptoms of Tourette’s syndrome, increase appetite and stem weight loss in people with HIV/AIDs, and improve symptoms of PTSD and anxiety.
Based on the AHA panel’s conclusions, it sounds like an obvious choice: Oils that have the most polyunsaturated fats, like corn and soybean, appear to be the healthiest overall because they have the most benefit for heart health. But that’s not the real message. The panel’s work echoes what you’ve been hearing for years: All other factors in your diet being equal, the type of fats you consume—not the total amount of them—is the most important thing. So there is no single oil to anoint as “the winner.” The answer instead involves different types of oils and how we consume them:
There’s also the cost factor: Chronic use of CBD oil can be costly and less effective against microbes compared to alternative antimicrobial herbs like Japanese knotweed, cat’s claw, andrographis, garlic, sarsaparilla, and berberine. The bottom line is, CBD oil is a good option for controlling symptoms associated with Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, and other chronic illnesses, but it should be combined with other antimicrobial and immunomodulating herbs for optimal benefit. CBD oil is best used intermittently to treat symptoms of pain or anxiety, or used chronically only until symptoms gradually resolve, and then discontinued.

Check Dr. Stephen Porges’ work, as well as Stanley Rosenburg. Both treat trauma and the vagus nerve’s role in bodily symptoms, which cause a lot of the symptoms you mention, as well as other people here. Some of Stanley Rosenburg’s simple exercises along with Stephen Porges’ work, can realign the vagus nerve and when done regularly have a cumulative effect. Basically, most symptoms, even seizures can be caused by misalignments and/or contracted muscles, (even the tiniest muscle in the human body, the stapedius muscle when chronically contracted can cause havoc on body) all under the umbrella of the vagus nerve (polyvagal nervous system). This is very well researched and is cutting edge treatment without the use of drugs of any kind. Some of Porges’ treatments use music, believe it or not, specially designed headsets with bone conduction. But please research, there are therapists trained in this field and in meantime, you can self-apply Stanley Rosenburg’s Basic Exercise, as well as others, first and you will see drastic results.


Stephanie, generally, I have patients take 20 to 150mg a day for sleep +/- anxiety. Start low and go slow. Know the dosages of your product. Usually 2/3 to 3/4 of the daily dose is 1-2 hours before bedtime, and the other portion is upon waking (to improve wakefulness during the day). Other factors such as stress, hormone replacement, other meds & medical conditions, etc. play a role along with individual differences. I own a compounding pharmacy, so we see a lot of unique needs. I can't give more specific advice in this forum, but there is help!
Using CBD in defined doses for medicinal purposes is one thing, but putting it in food and beverages is something entirely different. Someone may wind up getting CBD from multiple products, and so their daily dose could vary significantly. Taking a standardized dose of CBD oil daily as a recognized medicinal is a very different thing from taking uncontrolled doses of CBD isolate daily infused artificially into food and beverage products, and the long term risk may be very different — no one really knows for sure.
Four studies have compared the heart-health effects of a diet rich in conventional sunflower oil, a polyunsaturated fat, with a diet rich in canola oil, which has more monounsaturated fat. The researchers concluded that sunflower oil and canola oil had similar effects: Both reduced people's levels of total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, according to a 2013 review of those studies, published in the journal Nutrition Reviews.
Ive been taking CBD tincture oil for 8 months now. It has made such a positive improvement in my life. I have more energy and I feel better overall. I feel like myself after many years of an overall feeling of lethargy. After taking CBD oil for 6 months, I went to my doctor for a regular check up. All my my bloodwork test results- including A1C and cholesteral- improved. As an added bonus, I lost 25 lbs. All of this without even trying. Adding CBD to my life has given me more energy. I feel like my metabolism has improved. Nowadays, I look forward to each day as what can I do today, while before CBD, my attitude was negative and what do I have to do today. Nothing else in my life has changed. In fact, it has become more stressful due to family illness. But CBD has taken the edge off and continues to be my go-to daily supplement. I use Medterra 500mg tincture oil and take 1/2 a dropper twice a day. Everyone is different, so adjust the amount and strength until you find what works best for you. Definitely do it. Take CBD. Youll be so happy that you did.
As for phytocannabinoid-rich hemp oil, due to the presence of the hemp plant’s cannabinoids there are many additional uses and benefits with practically zero side effects. The most common use of this type of hemp oil is for chronic pain management, but many people also use it to treat some symptoms of cancer, among other diseases and conditions. Even the Food and Drug Administration recently approved a new CBD-based prescription medication.
Most of us regard cooking oil as nothing more than a means to a non-sticking end. But (and this is a big, prepare-to-gag kind of but) the average American consumes a whopping 36 pounds of cooking oils per year — more than three times as much as in the early 1970s. These oils contributed more than 400 calories to our daily diet in 2010 (the Census Bureau suspiciously quit collecting data on how much fat and oil companies produce in 2011, meaning the Department of Agriculture can no longer use that data to accurately calculate how many calories cooking oil contributes to the average American diet).
Right now, there’s a good chance that you don’t really know what you’re getting from any source. Testing and labeling rules vary by state, but many states that allow legal cannabis also require some kind of testing to verify that the THC and CBD levels listed on the label are accurate. However, this testing is controversial, and results can vary widely between labs, Jikomes said. A study published in March found measurable variations in test results, with some labs consistently reporting higher or lower levels of cannabinoids than others. There are no guarantees that the label accurately reflects what’s in the product. For a 2015 study published in JAMA, researchers tested 75 products purchased in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Seattle and found that only 17 percent were accurately labeled. More than half of the products contained significantly lower levels of cannabinoids than the label promised, and some of them contained only negligible amounts of the compounds. “We need to come up with ways to confidently verify the composition of cannabis products and make this information available to consumers,” Jikomes said.
One of the earliest success stories involves a young girl named Charlotte who was given an ingestible oil derived from Charlotte’s Web, a CBD strain that was specifically developed to provide her with all the benefits of the drug without the high. In less than two years, Charlotte went from a monthly seizure count of 1,200 to about three. Other success stories followed and more parents have begun to speak out, particularly parents who are desperate for access to this life-saving treatment.
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